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On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization characterized COVID-19 as a pandemic. On March 13, 2020, the President of …


A “trade secret” is broadly defined as any formula, pattern, device or compilation of information unknown to others that gives …


Creating a successful business that can support your family is an amazing accomplishment. And building that business with family you …


News over the last decade has highlighted the horror stories surrounding fraudulent financial activity and its far-reaching impacts. According to …


Shareholder disputes can be inevitable. Companies need to understand how to most effectively diffuse these disputes when they happen and …


Many turn to IT support in the event our laptops, home computers, or other devices appear to be having technical difficulties. Recently, however, two individuals were indicted for running what could be one of the largest tech-support scams ever recorded.


The average business loses 5% of its yearly income to fraud according to an Association of Certified Fraud Examiners Global Fraud Study. Increasingly, business fraud takes the form of a Ponzi scheme. Investors and businesses alike need to understand what a Ponzi scheme looks like to avoid falling victim. To confuse things, investments-gone-bad are increasingly being called Ponzi schemes by people who should know better. Failing to recognize the difference can prevent an investor from pursuing the best remedy to recover their investment losses.


The doctrine of sovereign immunity deprives federal and state courts of jurisdiction over suits against governments and their agencies unless the government waives immunity. The Eleventh Amendment enshrines sovereign immunity in our Constitution: “The Judicial power of the United States shall not be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced or prosecuted against one of the United States by Citizens of another State.” In other words, the Constitution divests federal courts of jurisdiction over suits against states or their agencies.


Many retailers are finding it increasingly difficult to keep their brick-and-mortar businesses afloat. Each week seems to bring new reports of another once-popular chain shuttering its doors or filing for bankruptcy. What you don’t often see, however, is the SEC getting involved. This is exactly what occurred when the SEC alleged Conn’s engaged in improper accounting practices.